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Sleeper Types: Side Sleepers
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Sleeper Types: Side Sleepers
by BetterSleep
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If you're like most people, you sleep on your side. It is comfortable and the most common sleep position, which is good for your spine. Your sleeping position matters and does more than helping you get comfortable. It also affects your sleep quality and can lead to or prevent certain sleep disorders. If you're a side sleeper, read on to discover the benefits and drawbacks of this popular sleeping position. Also, we will explain how to improve your sleep while optimizing this common sleeping position.

Side Sleeping- How Common is it?

It is interesting to note that side sleeping is the most popular sleep position in humans, with more than 60% of people spending at least some time each night sleeping on their side. This preference for side sleeping emerges in adulthood after we have spent our childhood years equally divided between all sleep positions.

It is thought that the reason side sleeping is so prevalent is because it offers a number of advantages compared to other positions. For example, side sleeping has been shown to improve circulation, reduce snoring, and ease back pain. Pregnant women are often advised to sleep on their sides to reduce the risk of stillbirth.

From an evolutionary perspective, it is believed that side sleeping evolved to protect against predators, as lying on our stomachs or backs leaves us more vulnerable to attack. Regardless of why we sleep, it is clear that this position plays an important role in human health and well-being.

Connection Between Sleep Position & Sleep Posture

Most people spend about a third of their lives asleep, so it's important to understand how different sleep positions and postures can impact our health. Sleep position is the position in which we fall asleep and remain during sleep, while sleep posture is the position our body assumes during sleep.

There are four main sleep positions: supine (sleeping on the back), prone (stomach sleeping), lateral (sleeping on the side), and semi-reclined (sleeping with the head elevated). Each position has its benefits and drawbacks. For example, sleeping on your back allows gravity to evenly distribute your weight, which helps to reduce pain and pressure points. However, this position can also lead to snoring and obstructive sleep apnea. Also, you should use a billow behind your knees if you sleep on your back to relieve pressure on your spine.

Sleeping on your stomach is generally not recommended as it can strain your neck and back. This position is also more likely to cause disruptions in breathing. Sleeping on your side is considered the best position for overall health as it minimizes stress on your spine and helps to reduce snoring. Semi-reclined positions are often used by people with GERD or other respiratory problems as they help to keep the airways open.

There is no one perfect sleep position or posture for everyone, so it's important to experiment to find what works best for you.

How Do I Know I'm a Side Sleeper?

Most people fall into one of three categories regarding sleep position: side, stomach, or back. Side sleepers comprise the largest group, with an estimated 74% of the population preferring this position.

But how can you be sure that you're a side sleeper? There are a few telltale signs. First, take a look at your pillow. If it's flat and shows no sign of uneven compression, it's likely that you will Sleep on your side. If you find that you often have a pillow in between your shoulder and head, or if you hug a pillow while you sleep, chances are you're a side sleeper.

Second, check for wrinkles on your face in the morning. Side sleepers often wake up with creases on their cheeks or forehead from lying on the pillow. Finally, consider your bedclothes. You're likely a side sleeper if you pull the covers up high over your head or huddled in a fetal position.

If you identify with any of these characteristics, there's a good chance you're a side sleeper. And that's not a bad thing! Side sleeping is associated with numerous health benefits, including reduced risk of snoring and better spine alignment. So if you're a side sleeper, congratulations! You're part of the majority.

Best Pillow Types for Side Sleepers

The pillow you pick as a side sleeper can significantly affect your comfort level and overall sleep quality. When looking for a new pillow, here's what you should consider as a side sleeper:

  • Loft: how thick or thin is the pillow?
  • Firmness: is the pillow soft, or does it provide lots of support?
  • Types of filling: what material is the pillow made of?

If you sleep on your side, you'll have lots of space underneath your head and neck. Because of this, you need a pillow that's thick enough to fill in that space.

However, a too-thick pillow will take your spine out of alignment, which may cause neck pain. Side sleepers need supportive pillows that aren't too firm. Pillows that are too soft will go flat while you sleep. Try a pillow with an adjustable filling so that you can customize it to your needs.

Is a Pillow Top Mattress Good for Side Sleepers?

A top pillow mattress often has an extra cushioning layer on one side. That's the side meant for sleeping on. The other side is usually firmer. That's the part you sit on when you're getting in and out of bed. If you're a side sleeper, a top pillow mattress might be just what you need.

The extra cushioning layer helps keep your spine in alignment and prevents you from sinking into the mattress too deeply. However, pillow tops are not renowned for their durability. They often lose their shape within a few short years.

If you're looking for a bouncy mattress that cushions the body and retains its shape for years to come, consider a hybrid. The dense foam top of a quality hybrid resists compression and maintains its shape after years of use.

Best Mattresses for Side Sleepers

Someone who sleeps on their back won't need the same type of mattress as someone who sleeps on their side. If you're a side sleeper, you'll put too much pressure on your hips, but you also need enough support to keep your spine in alignment.

Look for a mattress that can contour to the shape of your body without letting you sink too deep. A mattress that's too firm may cause pain in your sides.

There isn't one ideal mattress for side sleepers because everyone has different needs. You'll also need a different level of support depending on your weight. The heavier your body, the firmer your mattress needs to be.

Why Do My Sides or Hips Hurt When I Wake Up?

Sleeping with hip pain or other types of pain can be challenging for side sleepers. That's because the pressure points tend to land on the hips and sides when you sleep on your side. If you tend to sleep on a single side, the pressure will accumulate on that side more quickly than if you switch between sides during the night.

Try switching which side you sleep on every other night if you're comfortable doing so. Side sleepers can also benefit from knee pillows to support the natural curve of their back and alleviate the pressure on their hips. Consider spending some time doing gentle stretches in the morning. You can try a lunge or figure-four stretch to alleviate the pressure on your hips.

Finally, ensure you've chosen the best mattress and pillow for your sleeping position. Even if you have the right mattresses and pillows, they may be too old, so they'll no longer provide enough support.

Whether you sleep on your side, back, or front, you can improve the quality of your sleep with a relaxing bedtime routine. Try the BetterSleep App for free to get hundreds of soothing sounds, guided meditations, gentle bedtime movements, and even bedtime stories to help you fall asleep faster.

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What are the Benefits of Side Sleeping?

Side sleeping is one of the most popular positions, and for a good reason. It's comfortable, it's easy to do, and it offers a variety of benefits. Below are the benefits of side sleeping:

Sleeping on Your Side Helps You Breathe Better

When you sleep on your back, your tongue and soft palate collapse to the back wall of your throat, causing partial airway obstruction. "In some people, this can cause the tissues in the back of the throat to vibrate, which results in snoring," says neurologist Rachel Marie E. Salas, M.D., assistant medical director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Sleep and Wellness in Baltimore.

If you have sleep apnea—a condition in which breathing is interrupted during sleep—the obstruction can be complete and may result in gasping or choking sounds as your brain rouses you enough to reopen the airway. The snoring associated with sleep apnea can be loud and disruptive, a common symptom of the condition. Sleeping on your side may help to prevent snoring by keeping your airway open.

If you're a back sleeper, try propping yourself up with pillows or using a body pillow to encourage side sleeping. You may also want to invest in a specialty pillow that helps to keep your head and neck aligned while you sleep. These measures may help you (and your partner) to get a better night's rest.

Sleeping on the Side May Boost Brain Power.

There are many benefits to getting a good night's sleep, and new research suggests that sleeping on your side may help boost brain power. When we sleep, our brains go into "cleanup mode" and flush away toxins and waste products accumulated during the day. This process is known as the glymphatic system, which appears to be most effective when we sleep on our right side.

According to Maiken Nedergaard, a professor of neuroscience and neurology at the University of Rochester Medical Center, who discovered the brain's cleaning system, this may be because sleeping on our right side allows cerebrospinal fluid to flow more easily around the brain.

This is important because cerebrospinal fluid helps to remove beta-amyloid, a substance linked to Alzheimer's disease. So if you want to keep your brain healthy, make sure you get plenty of rest – and try to sleep on your right side!

Side Sleeping is the Best for Back Pain

Many people experience lower back pain at some point in their lives, with nearly 65 million Americans reporting a recent episode of back pain. For some, the pain is chronic and can be debilitating. Others may only experience occasional discomfort. Regardless of the cause, a few things can be done to help alleviate the symptoms. One of the most important is to choose the right sleeping position.

The best sleeping position for lower back pain is on your side with a pillow or blanket between the knees. This helps to take pressure off of the spine and can also relieve symptoms for those with neck or back pain.

When choosing a pillow, it is important to pick one with a loft or thickness that matches the distance between your neck and shoulder. With a thicker pillow, your neck will stay aligned with your spine as you sleep on your side, preventing pain and soreness while maintaining proper alignment.

Additionally, side sleeping can help to reduce snoring and improve circulation throughout the body. While there are many different sleeping positions, side sleeping is often the best option for those suffering from lower back pain.

Individuals can take pressure off their spine and improve their comfort by using a pillow of the correct loft and placing it between the knees.

Side Sleeping Protects the Heart

Sleep is an important part of overall health, and certain positions can help to promote better sleep and health. For example, sleeping on your right side is beneficial for heart health. According to a recent study, this position helps keep the heart in place between the lungs and prevents abnormal electrocardiogram changes (ECGs).

Left-side sleeping is also generally safe, but it is not recommended for people with heart problems. So if you're looking to give your heart a little extra protection, be sure to switch sides at bedtime.

Sleeping on the Left Side Aids in Better Digestion.

Most people are unaware that their sleep side can affect their digestion. The discomfort of heartburn, indigestion, and acid reflux disease, also known as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) — can ruin a good night's sleep.

Sleeping on the right side can aggravate heartburn and other digestive problems, but sleeping on the left can help improve digestion. When you lie on your right side, stomach contents tend to spill over into the lower part of the esophagus, where they can stimulate more acid secretion and promote pain and heartburn.

Recent research shows that GERD sufferers who sleep on the right side not only experience more heartburn than those who sleep on their left side, but these episodes also last longer. The left side is the natural position for the stomach, and it can help to ease the flow of food through the digestive tract. In addition, sleeping on the left side also allows gravity to keep the stomach acids from flowing back into the esophagus.

As a result, sleeping on your left side is a simple way to promote better digestion and reduce digestive problems. If you're not used to sleeping on your side, it may take a few nights to get comfortable. But it's worth the effort: GERD can lead to more serious health problems over time if it's not treated.

Side Sleeping Reduces Snoring & Sleep Apnea Symptoms

When you sleep on your back, your tongue and soft palate can collapse and block your airway. This can lead to snoring or even sleep apnea, where you stop breathing for short periods throughout the night.

Sleeping on your side can help keep your airways open and unobstructed, allowing you to breathe a little easier while you sleep. In addition, sleeping on your side may also help reduce symptoms of GERD by keeping stomach acids from flowing back into the esophagus.

So if you're looking for a way to get a better night's sleep, try sleeping on your side. It just might make all the difference.

Types of Side Sleeping

Side sleeping is one of the most popular positions, and for a good reason. It's comfortable, it helps reduce snoring, and it can even help reduce back pain. But did you know that there are different types of side sleepers? Here's a look at the common types of side sleepers and the benefits of each.

The Fetal Position Sleeper

This is the most common type of side sleeper, and it's pretty much exactly what it sounds like. You're curled up in a tight ball, with your knees pulled up to your chest and your head resting on your hands. This position has several benefits, including increased warmth and improved fetal circulation. Also, it is a good position for people with back pain because it takes the pressure off the spine.

Additionally, the fetal position can help reduce snoring by opening the airway. However, the fetal position can also cause hip and shoulder pain and backaches. As such, it's important to choose a side-sleeping position that is comfortable and supportive.

The Log Sleeper

Log sleepers are individuals who sleep almost exclusively on their side, with their arms along their torso in a horizontal position. This peculiar sleeping arrangement is the source of the log sleeper's name. Log sleepers often wake up in the same position they fell asleep, which can signify that they achieved a deep and restful sleep.

Although relatively uncommon, the log sleeping position is normal and does not indicate any underlying health issues. Many experts believe that this position is beneficial for overall spine health.

So, if you find yourself dozing off in the log position, there's no need to worry - you're likely getting a good night's rest.

The Yearner Sleeper

Side sleepers come in all different shapes and sizes. Some people curl up in a fetal position, while others sprawl out like they're on a beach. Then there are the rare few who adopt the yearner sleeper position. As the name suggests, this involves lying on your side with your arms outstretched in front of you.

Your legs should also be straight, creating a long, lithe figure. This position is great for people who want to stretch their muscles before bed. It's also perfect for anyone who wants to achieve a sense of balance and calm before drifting off to sleep.

So if you're looking for a new way to sleep, don't forget about the yearner sleeper position. You might just find that it's the perfect fit for you.

The Prayer Position

The prayer position is a common sleeping position for those who tend to experience neck pain. In this position, you sleep on your side with your hands together as if in prayer. Then, you place your hands under your head or the pillow. This helps elevate your head, which could signify that your pillows are old and need to be replaced with firmer options.

The prayer position can also help to reduce snoring and improve breathing. If you suffer from sleep apnea or other breathing disorders, sleeping in the prayer position may help you to breathe more easily.

However, it is important to consult a doctor before changing your sleep habits. Sleeping in the prayer position may not be suitable for everyone, and it is always best to speak with a medical professional before trying new sleep positions.

The Eternal Snuggler

You may be an eternal snuggler if you find yourself snuggling with pillows and blankets every night. This tendency is usually due to a need for extra warmth or support. While you may start out in this position, waking up like this is common. Generally, eternal snugglers are people who tend to feel cold easily or who have trouble sleeping.

If you're an eternal snuggler, you can do a few things to make yourself more comfortable at night. First, try using a heavier blanket or investing in a body pillow. These will provide additional warmth and support, helping you to sleep more soundly.

You can also try wearing warmer pajamas or a heating pad before bed. By taking these steps, you can ensure you'll get a good night's sleep – without snuggling up to your pillows and blankets all night long.

The Reacher

The Reacher is one of the most common side sleeping positions. In this position, sleepers will have their arms stretched out in front of them. This can make it so their legs sprawl out as well. This position is common because it allows for a greater range of motion. People who sleep in this position often report feeling more comfortable and improving their sleep quality.

However, this position can also be associated with snoring and sleep apnea, as the relaxed muscles in the throat can cause the airway to become blocked. Nonetheless, the Reacher remains a popular choice for side sleepers, as it provides a high degree of comfort and flexibility.

Left or Right - Which is the Best Sleep Position

Regarding side sleeping, your best bet is to stick with the left side. This position applies less pressure on your internal organs and is easier on the digestive system - making it a good choice for pregnant women and those with GERD or acid reflux. However, no doubt increase in brain power is one of the benefits of sleeping on the right side.

Sleeping on the left can help to reduce symptoms of heartburn. If you're not already a side sleeper, this may be a position worth trying out! Sleeping in a less symmetrical way can increase your risk of pain symptoms upon waking up. To reduce this risk, pillows are important to achieve a side sleeping position that aligns your spine from your hips to your head.

Put pillows on either side of your body to keep yourself in place, and place a small pillow between the knees to even out the hips. By following these simple tips, you can help to ensure a comfortable and pain-free night's sleep. Regardless of which side you choose, ensure that your head and neck are supported with a pillow to ensure proper alignment.

The Best Sleep Position for Pregnancy

Pregnancy is a time of many changes, both physical and emotional. Getting a good night's sleep is more important than ever when pregnant. Not only are you dealing with the usual pregnancy symptoms like fatigue and nausea, but you also have to contend with the added weight of a growing baby.

Thankfully, a sleeping position can help alleviate some of the discomforts of pregnancy and promote better overall health for both mother and child.

Experts recommend sleeping on your side with the knees bent. This position relieves the pressure of a growing belly and enables the heart to pump and blood to flow easily throughout the body. In particular, the left side is recommended because it prevents pressure on the liver and facilitates healthy blood flow to the fetus, uterus, kidneys, and heart.

So if you're looking for a way to get comfortable and promote a healthy pregnancy, sleeping on your side is the way to go.

Creating a Comfortable Sleeping Environment for Side Sleepers

Side sleepers need a little extra care when creating a comfortable sleeping environment. The ideal mattress for a side sleeper is medium to the firm in support.

This will provide the right support for the hips and shoulders while allowing the spine to align correctly. In addition, side sleepers should look for a mattress with a good amount of edge support.

This will prevent them from sprawling out at night and help keep them in a more comfortable position. Pillows are also important for side sleepers. A pillow that is too high can cause the head to be pushed forward, while a pillow that is too low can cause neck pain.

The best pillow for a side sleeper is medium-firm and supportive. Finally, it is important to choose soft and smooth sheets and bedding. Rough or coarse fabrics can irritate the skin and make it difficult to get comfortable. By following these simple tips, side sleepers can create a sleeping environment that is both comfortable and supportive.

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What are the Cons of Side Sleeping?

You should be aware of a few potential downsides to side sleeping. First, it's more likely that you'll toss and turn if you're a side sleeper. This can disrupt your alignment, especially if you don't know how to turn yourself properly.

If you do find yourself turning in your sleep, try to roll your body in one smooth motion rather than turning at your waist. This will help keep your alignment in check. Additionally, side sleepers may experience more hip and shoulder pain than back sleepers. This is because the weight of your body can put pressure on these joints when you're lying on your side.

If you experience pain in these areas, special pillows can help alleviate some of the pressure. Below are other cons of side sleeping:

Increased Pressure on the Heart

When it comes to side sleeping, there are both pros and cons. One of the potential cons is increased pressure on the heart. This happens when you sleep on your left side, as your chest cavity presses against your heart.

While most people don't notice this increased pressure, it can affect a person's cardiac output and heart rate. This is especially a concern for people with congestive heart failure, who should avoid sleeping on their left side.

In addition, side sleeping can also put additional pressure on the neck and shoulders and may contribute to wrinkles forming on the face. However, side sleeping has some benefits, such as improved digestion and reduced snoring. Ultimately, it's up to each individual to decide whether the pros or cons of side sleeping are more important to them.

An Awkward Position for the Arm

Many people tuck their arms under their pillows when they sleep, leading to pain and numbness in the arm and shoulder areas. Additionally, side sleeping can pressure your hips and shoulders, leading to pain or discomfort.

And finally, if you sleep on your stomach while side sleeping, you may end up with a crick in your neck. While there are some downsides to side sleeping, it's still generally considered a healthy sleeping position – just be sure to use a pillow that properly supports your neck and head.

Increase in Risk of Acne

Side sleeping can increase the risk of acne. This is because when you sleep on your side, you are pressing half of your face into your pillow for 7 to 9 hours a night. Over time, this can lead to your pillow collecting facial oils, sweat, and other debris and irritants, which can then cause acne flare-ups.

Acne is not the only skin concern that side sleepers should be aware of. You may also notice wrinkles forming on your face when you sleep on your side. This is because when you press your face against a pillow, you crease your skin in certain areas.

To help prevent acne and wrinkles, it is important to change your pillowcase at least once a week and to take care of your skin during the day. Additionally, you may opt for a good skincare routine that can help keep your skin clean or at least reduce the chances of acne. Natural face moisturizers, anti-aging creams, and face serums are good products to help with this.

Potential to Develop Bad Posture

It can be easy to develop bad posture when sleeping on your side. If you twist your body too far or shift your spine out of alignment, you may wake up with pain or stiffness. To avoid this, pay attention to your body posture as you sleep.

Your head should be level with your shoulders, and your spine should be in a neutral position. Also, ensure your chin isn't tucked against your chest, which can lead to neck pain. Ultimately, whether or not side sleeping is right for you is a personal decision. Consider the pros and cons before deciding how to sleep at night.

Morning Stretch for Light Sleepers

Waking up can be hard sometimes. You may feel groggy, and your body may feel stiff from sleeping in the same position all night. This is especially true for side sleepers, who may have been subconsciously curling up as they slept.

But there's a way to start the day that can help invigorate you and make you feel more flexible: stretching! Stretching in the morning helps circulate blood and loosen up muscles and joints, making you less likely to experience stiffness later in the day.

And it only takes a few minutes to do! If you're looking for stretches to add to your morning routine, neck stretches are a great option. They're quick and easy to do and can help improve your flexibility. So next time you wake up feeling stiff, try stretching it out! It just might make your day a whole lot better.

When Should I Consider a Different Sleeping Position?

When choosing a sleeping position, there is no one-size-fits-all answer. Instead, it is important to experiment with different positions to find the most comfortable for you.

If you struggle to get comfortable while sleeping on your side, it may be worth considering a switch to sleeping on your back. This position can offer several potential benefits, including relief from back pain. Additionally, back sleeping may also help to reduce snoring and improve breathing. If you struggle with insomnia, switching to back sleeping may also help you get a better night's sleep.

However, it is important to remember that the back sleeping position may not suit everyone. Those with certain medical conditions, such as respiratory disorders or pregnant women, should avoid sleeping on their backs. If you have any concerns about changing your sleeping position, speak with your doctor first.

Bottom Line

Side sleeping is a great way to ease acid reflux and sleep apnea symptoms. It's also been linked with improving brain health overall. If you are a side sleeper, there are some important things to consider when choosing a mattress.

A good mattress for a side sleeper will contour your body and keep your spine in alignment. It is also important that the mattress be firm enough to support your weight without causing pressure points. If you are not sure what type of mattress is best for you, it is always best to consult with a sleep specialist. They can help you determine the right type of mattress and pillow for your individual needs.

If you are having trouble sleeping, consider trying the side sleeper position. Thanks for following along on our exploration of sleeper types!

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